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Footnotes: The NOPA Blog

Posts for category: Foot Conditions

By blog@nolapodiatry.com
December 03, 2014
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Untagged

According to the World Health Organization, as obesity increases in young adults and children, so do foot and ankle problems. These issues are more likely to occur because there is too much pressure being put on the lower extremities. Obese children are less likely to participate in physical activities due to the problems that may occur in the foot structure and often time, obese individuals end up with flat feet due to the pressure. Childhood obesity may have a negative effect on the feet over a period of time and may result in permanent issues with foot function. For children and young adults to reduce the chance of permanent foot problems, it is important to establish the proper amount of diet and exercise. For some, additional coaching may be necessary to overcome the challenges of obesity.

Obesity has become very problematic at this point in time and can have extremely negative effects on the feet if not taken care of properly. If you’re an obese individual and you’re concerned about your feet, talk to one of our podiatrists of New Orleans Podiatry Associates. Our doctors can determine if your weight has caused you to develop any complications in your lower extremities and get you the care that you need.

Obesity and your Feet

Since your feet are what support your entire weight when standing, any additional weight can result in pain and swelling. Being overweight is one of the main contributors to foot complications.

Problems & Complications

Extra Weight– Even putting on just a few extra pounds could create serious complications for your feet. As your weight increases, your balance and body will shift, creating new stresses on your feet. This uneven weight distribution can cause pain, even while doing the simplest tasks, such as walking.

Diabetes– People who are overweight are at serious risk of developing type-2 diabetes, which has a drastic impact on the health of your feet. As you get older, your diabetes might worsen, which could lead to loss of feeling in your feet, sores, and bruises. You could also become more prone to various infections.

Plantar fasciitis – Pressure and stress that is placed on muscles, joints, and tendons can trigger plantar fasciitis, which is an inflammation of tissue that forms along the bottom of the foot. 

For more information about Obesity and Your Feet, follow the link below.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact one of our offices located in Metairie and New Orleans, LO. We offer the latest in diagnostic and treatment technologies to meet all your needs.

Read more about Obesity and Your Feet

By New Orleans Podiatry Associates
November 20, 2014
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Shin Splints  

Shin SplintsAlthough a shin splint is commonly used to describe various pains between the ankle and the knee, it actually refers to a specific inflammatory condition of the tibia -- a condition called medial tibial stress syndrome.

A type of "overuse injury" to the legs, the most common causes of shin splints include excessive running, poor conditioning and over-pronation (flattening of the arch). The result is pain in the front or inside of the lower leg that usually gets worse with a sudden increase in distance or intensity of training. Shin splints are a common problem for many runners and athletes. Muscle weakness, non-supportive shoes and overtraining are also contributing factors.

To prevent shin splints, warm up and stretch muscles before starting any work out activity and choose supportive footwear. Begin work outs gradually and avoid over-training. All of these methods will go a long way in helping to prevent many lower leg problems. Conservative treatment for most shin splint pain includes rest, ice, compression and elevation. Strengthening exercises, anti-inflammatory agents and custom foot orthotics may also be recommended to reduce symptoms.

Shin pain isn't always indicative of a shin splint. Lower leg pain may actually signal a more serious problem, including a stress fracture, partial muscle tear and tendonitis, all of which require special treatment. Always seek the professional care of a podiatrist if:

  • Severe pain in your shin follows an injury
  • Your shin is hot and inflamed
  • Swelling in your shin increases
  • Shin pain persists during rest

Proper diagnosis of the cause of pain is necessary in order to administer the most appropriate treatment. If you suffer from shin pain, visit New Orleans Podiatry Associates for an evaluation and proper treatment.

By blog@nolapodiatry.com
October 28, 2014
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Untagged

Kelly Bradford found several lumps in her heels and first believed them to be corns due to their rough texture. The growths did not seem to be going away with the help of salicylic acid and were much more painful that corns usually are. When the growths became so painful that Bradford could not place her heels on the ground, she decided to contact her doctor.

Bradford’s physician concluded that she did not have corns and had contracted plantar warts.  The pain she was more painful than anything she has experienced because the warts were pinching the nerves of her feet. With the help of some over-the-counter medication and cryotherapy, the warts in Bradford’s heels soon disappeared.

Plantar warts  can be painful and can worsen if not treated properly. If you would like to be treated for plantar warts, consult with one of our podiatrists of New Orleans Podiatry Associates. Our doctors will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs and provide you with quality treatment.

About Plantar Warts

Plantar warts are found on the feet. These warts are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV) getting into open wounds on the feet. You can recognize plantar warts by a hard bump on the foot. They are usually found on the heels or balls of the feet. Plantar warts are usually not a sign of anything dangerous but do not ignore them if they do cause pain or embarrassment.

If you do have a plantar wart, you may notice some pain when standing but since these warts are not cancerous or dangerous, a podiatrist only needs to be seen if there is excess pain. Although plantar warts don’t often call for treatment, there are options available. They can be frozen off, removed by an electric tool or burned off using laser treatment.

Home remedies are also available to help with plantar warts. An apple cider vinegar soak can help remove the wart. You can soak your feet in the vinegar for 20 minutes before using a pumice stone to remove any loose skin from the wart.

For more information about Plantar Warts, follow the link below.

If you have any questions, please contact one of our offices located in Metairie and New Orleans, LA. We offer all the latest in diagnostic and treatment technologies to meet your needs.

Read more about Plantar Warts

A recent study from the researcher faculty at St. George’s University of London discovered that diabetes patients with systematic disease peripheral neuropathy may be more susceptible to heart disease than diabetics without the condition. The faculty discovered this information after they observed around 13,000 type-2 diabetes patients that had never reported any cardiopulmonary problems. This information may be useful to doctors that are trying to determine the probability that a certain diabetes patient will get heart disease. “There is likely an unmet potential to reduce cardiovascular disease in this group of patients through greater monitoring and simple treatments," stated Robert Hinchliffe, Senior Lecturer and Consultant in Vascular Surgery.

Systemic diseases typically affect the whole body, but they can be particularly detrimental to the heels. If a systemic disease is causing you to experience lower extremity problems, see one of our podiatrists of New Orleans Podiatry Associates. We will analyze your need for treatment and provide you with a suitable form of medical care.

Systemic Diseases and the Feet

Systemic diseases affect the whole body, and symptoms usually are displayed in the feet. This condition can make a patient’s ability to walk unbearable. Systemic diseases include: gout, diabetes mellitus, neurological disorders, and arthritis.

Gout – is caused by an excess of uric acid in the body. Some common symptoms include pain, inflammation, and redness at the metatarsal/phalangeal joint of the base big toe. Gout can be treated by NSAIDs, which relieves pain and inflammation and other drugs which lowers the acid levels in the body.

Diabetes mellitus- is an increase in the level of blood sugar in which the body cannot counteract with the insulin in the body. When the body doesn’t produce enough insulin this is a factor in Diabetes.

Diabetes of the Feet

● Diabetic Neuropathy – may lead to damaged nerves and affect the feet through numbness and loss of sensation.

● Peripheral Vascular Disease- can restrict the blood flow to the feet, and often times lead to amputation of the feet. 

For more information about Systemic Diseases and the Feet, follow the link below.

If you have any questions, please contact one of our offices in Louisiana.We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Systemic Diseases and the Feet

By New Orleans Podiatry Associates
October 02, 2014
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Plantar Warts  

Plantar WartPlantar warts are benign growths that develop on the bottom of your feet caused by direct contact with the human papilloma virus (HPV) -- the same virus that causes warts on other areas of the body. Some people are more susceptible than others to HPV, and not everyone will develop plantar warts if they come into contact with the virus. Individuals with weak immune systems or damaged skin on the feet are at a higher risk for plantar warts.

Plantar warts most often develop on the weight-bearing areas of the foot -- the heel or the ball of the foot -- causing sharp, burning pain. They can appear as a single wart (solitary) or a cluster of warts (mosaic). Common symptoms may include:

  • Pain or discomfort when walking or standing
  • Thick, scaly skin that often resembles a callus
  • Hard, flat growths with well-defined boundaries
  • Tiny black specks (clotted blood vessels) that often appear on the surface of the wart

Most warts disappear with home care and do not require medical treatment. You can take steps to prevent and treat plantar warts, which include:

  • Changing your shoes and socks daily
  • Keeping your feet clean and dry
  • Avoid picking at warts as the virus may spread
  • Avoid direct contact with an individual who has plantar warts
  • Checking your child's feet periodically
  • Refrain from walking barefoot, especially in public areas like showers, swimming pools and locker rooms
  • Never ignore skin growths or changes in your skin

You should always seek care from a podiatrist when warts interfere with your daily life, aren't responding to home treatments, or if you have circulatory disorders. Contact New Orleans Podiatry Associates if your warts:

  • Change color or shape
  • Cause unbearable pain and discomfort
  • Interfere with activities
  • Multiply or reappear

Without treatment, plantar warts can grow, spread and prompt new warts to grow as fast as the old ones disappear. If you can't confidently identify a growth on your foot, visit New Orleans Podiatry Associates to ensure a correct diagnosis. Early diagnosis and treatment from our New Orleans office can decrease the risk of the wart spreading and multiplying.